Open:2017 Platform Cooperatives

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The 17th century philosopher Spinoza, writing at a time of immense political and religious turbulence, believed that one of the most important political sentiments is hope (so Barack Obama was ploughing a well-worn furrow). As individuals we are relatively weak compared to the cumulative powers of others, but Spinoza said that when we come together through “a common hope” we are strengthened. In these current turbulent times the need to come together has never been more evident.

This is why I am delighted that the Institute for Creative & Cultural Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths is hosting a major conference on cooperation and the collaborative economy, Open:2017 Platform Cooperatives on the 16th -17th February here at Goldsmiths (a few tickets are still available here).

We are hosting this conference because, as a department we champion new approaches to the organisation of economic activity: new business models; new sources of finance; and the consequent need for new forms of organisation and management. In this vein we have, for the last five years, run the MA in Social Entrepreneurship with a highly inclusive remit. Indeed, the Social Enterprise field is so varied that it is small wonder that some commentators feel impelled to talk about it as a zoo.

For us here in ICCE, that zoo very definitely includes cooperatives and we look forward to hearing how platform cooperatives offer a genuine sharing economy alternative to the likes of Uber, AirBnB, other recent forms of platform capitalism and the ‘super-firms’ dominating the global economic landscape and exacerbating global inequality.

Richard Hull, Programme Director, MA Social Entrepreneurship

Social Enterprise: Which compromises will you make to reach your goals?

Institute for Creative & Cultural Entrepreneurship

Social Enterprise Lecture Series Autumn 2016

Tuesday 6th December 5.30 (not 5) – 7pm 

Admission is Free; Open To All within and beyond Goldsmiths (No need to book) 

Ray Barron-Woolford

Social Enterprise: Which compromises – political, social, economic – will you make to reach your goals?

  

Ray Barron-Woolford is a multi-award-winning social entrepreneur, author (best known for Food Bank Britain), broadcaster (Talk Radio Europe), campaigner and activist in People Before Profit. He has experience in establishing and running three very different social enterprises. Ray has won several awards including the Pink Paper’s award for the Best UK LGBT Business of the Year, the London Chamber of Commerce’s awards for the Best London Business for Innovation, the best London Business for Customer Service, and was a finalist for the London Business Person of the Year award, and he won the Greenwich Council’s award for Best Greenwich Business for Enterprise. He has also received a medal from the Russian government for his work on Deptford’s heritage

Today’s talk will focus on the possibility of working out a reliable model for social enterprise based on my day-to-day practice and experience of success and failure.

Venue:

Room PSH 326, Professor Stuart Hall Building (Opposite ICCE Office)

Goldsmiths, University of London, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW

For Directions to ICCE click here

Click tinyurl.com/zga8v2m for a list of all this Autumn’s speakers

Further enquiries to ICCE Department, A.Kynaston@Gold.ac.uk

or to Dr Richard Hull R.Hull@Gold.ac.uk

 

Paula Woodman, on the British Council’s Social Enterprise work

Institute for Creative & Cultural Entrepreneurship

Social Enterprise Lecture Series Autumn 2016

Tuesday 8th November 5.30 (not 5) – 7pm

Admission is Free; Open To All within and beyond Goldsmiths (No need to book)

Paula Woodman

The British Council’s Social Enterprise Work in 24 Countries

 

Paula Woodman has very recently been appointed a Visiting Fellow to the Institute for Creative & Cultural Entrepreneurship. She will be describing the wide range of activities conducted globally by the British Council to promote social enterprise. She was appointed in September 2015 to the new role of Senior Advisor, Social Enterprise at the British Council, having served as their Social Enterprise Advisor since 2012. She previously led on the development and implementation of the Social Enterprise Mark, having moved there from RISE (Social Enterprise SW England) who first developed the Mark.

Venue:

Room PSH 326, Professor Stuart Hall Building (Opposite ICCE Office)

Goldsmiths, University of London, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW

For Directions to ICCE click here

Click tinyurl.com/zga8v2m for a list of all this Autumn’s speakers

Further enquiries to ICCE Department, A.Kynaston@Gold.ac.uk

or to Dr Richard Hull R.Hull@Gold.ac.uk

 

Interview with Daisy – MA Social Entrepreneurship 2014

298001_1919875009780_1224136764_nWhere are you from and what did you do before coming to Goldsmiths?

I’m Irish, but I grew up in the US. I studied Development at the University of East Anglia. After graduating I worked for a social Enterprise in Swaziland called Tintsaba Craft. We worked with rural weavers and exported their products overseas to Fairtrade buyers. I was in charge of business development as well as the management of literacy and education projects, which I started.

Why did you chose social entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths?

After studying development and working in Swaziland I felt the old models of aid weren’t working and that social entrepreneurship is a more sustainable model for addressing social failures, especially in the developing world. In Swaziland there aren’t many alternative views on how to develop poverty reduction strategies, so I wanted to equip myself with the knowledge and ability to bring new thinking to Swaziland. I also wanted to return to London to build my networks in Social Entrepreneurship in the UK and be part of a dynamic environment. Goldsmiths social entrepreneurship is at the centre of the UK scene so it seemed like a natural choice.

Why Goldsmiths?

I really liked the fact that Goldsmiths is well known for its creativity and felt that being part of that environment would be an added value while studying social enterprise. Especially because I’m interested in artisan based enterprise the last organisation I worked with was very creative in nature.

What have you enjoyed about the course?

Firstly, I love being part of a diverse learning environment with so many different views and life experiences. So many of my classmates have real social enterprise experience and bring that wealth of knowledge to the program. Secondly, I’ve really enjoyed the entrepreneurial modelling class because it’s given me some hard skills in business planning that I can use in future roles. And thirdly we’ve had the space to develop our theoretical and conceptual understanding of social enterprise and social innovation.

Interview with Christian (Current MA Social Entrepreneurship Student at Goldsmiths)

ImageWhere are you from and what’s you background?

I’m Danish and I’ve just finished a BA in Journalism at City University.

Why Social Entrepreneurship?

I’m really interested in positive journalism and a solutions based mentality to the challenges we face, so social entrepreneurship seemed like a natural choice and the course at Goldsmiths is one of the only pure social enterprise courses in the world.

Why Goldsmiths?

The course of course! But also because it’s based in London, which is a real centre for this field. Also, if I’d been able to curate my own MA program, this would have been it. It blends the practical and theoretical as well as touching upon elements of business, economics and sociology. I love the cross-disciplinary environment at Goldsmiths. I also feel like being at Goldsmiths and in London, I am exposed to a diverse range of project and future employment opportunities.

What else are you working on?

In my spare time I work as a freelance journalist and I always have lots of projects on the go!